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3.4% of Newport residents infected with coronavirus, OSU study finds – KATU

NEWPORT, Ore. – Oregon State University’s door-to-door testing project found that about 3. 4% of people in Newport had the coronavirus on June 20 and 21, initial reports suggest. The Team-based Rapid Assessment of Community-Level Coronavirus Epide…

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How coronavirus affects the entire body – CNN

Coronavirus damages not only the lungs, but the kidneys, liver, heart, brain and nervous system, skin and gastrointestinal tract, doctors said Friday in a review of reports about Covid-19 patients.

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(CNN)Coronavirus damages not only the lungs, but the kidneys, liver, heart, brain and nervous system, skin and gastrointestinal tract, doctors said Friday in a review of reports about Covid-19 patients.
The team at the Columbia University Irving Medical Center in New York City one of the hospitals flooded with patients in the spring went through their own experiences and collected reports from other medical teams around the world.
Their comprehensive picture shows the coronavirus attacks virtually every major system in the human body, directly damaging organs and causing the blood to clot, the heart to lose its healthy rhythm, the kidneys to shed blood and protein and the skin to erupt in rashes. It causes headaches, dizziness, muscle aches, stomach pain and other symptoms along with classic respiratory symptoms like coughing and fever.
“Physicians need to think of COVID-19 as a multisystem disease,” said Dr. Aakriti Gupta, a cardiology fellow at Columbia who worked on the review, in a statement. “There’s a lot of news about clotting but it’s also important to understand that a substantial proportion of these patients suffer kidney, heart, and brain damage, and physicians need to treat those conditions along with the respiratory disease.”
Much of the damage wrought by the virus appears to come because of its affinity for a receptor a kind of molecular doorway into cells called ACE2. Cells lining the blood vessels, in the kidneys, the liver ducts, the pancreas, in the intestinal tract and lining the respiratory tract all are covered with ACE2 receptors, which the virus can use to grapple and infect cells, the Columbia team wrote in their review, published in the journal Nature Medicine.
“These findings suggest that multiple-organ injury may occur at least in part due to direct viral tissue damage,” the team wrote.
Coronavirus infection also activates the immune system. Part of that response includes the production of inflammatory proteins called cytokines. This inflammation can damage cells and organs and the so-called cytokine storm is one of the causes of severe symptoms.
“This virus is unusual and it’s hard not to take a step back and not be impressed by how many manifestations it has on the human body,” Dr. Mahesh Madhavan, another cardiology fellow who worked on the review, said in a statement,
Blood clotting effects appear to be caused by several different mechanisms: direct damage of the cells lining the blood vessels and interference with the various clotting mechanisms in the blood itself. Low blood oxygen caused by pneumonia can make the blood more likely to clot, the researchers said.
These clots can cause strokes and heart attacks or can lodge in the lungs or legs. They clog the kidneys and interfere with dialysis treatments needed for the sickest patients.
Damage to the pancreas can worsen diabetes, and patients with diabetes have been shown to be at the highest risk of severe illness and death from coronavirus.
The virus can directly damage the brain, but some of the neurological effects likely come from the treatment. “COVID-19 patients can be intubated for two to three weeks; a quarter require ventilators for 30 or more days,” Gupta said.
“These are very prolonged intubations, and patients need a lot of sedation. ‘ICU delirium’ was a well-known condition before COVID, and the hallucinations may be less an effect of the virus and more an effect of the prolonged sedation.”
The virus affects the immune system, depleting the T-cells the body usually deploys to fight off viral infections. “Lymphopenia, a marker of impaired cellular immunity, is a cardinal laboratory finding reported in 67-90% of patients with COVID-19,” the researchers wrote.
Doctors need to treat all of these effects when coronavirus patients show up in the hospital, the Columbia team said.
“Gastrointestinal symptoms may be associated with a longer duration of illness but have not been associated with increased mortality,” the researchers wrote. Many of the skin effects, such as rashes and purplish, swollen “Covid toes,” also clear up on their own.

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Victoria records 216 new cases and one death from coronavirus – The Age

A man in his nineties has died from the Covid-19 virus and the government has flagged mask use will be important part of lockdown ending

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Thirty of the new cases are connected to known outbreaks. There are 49 Victorians in hospital and 15 of those are in intensive care.
Mr Andrews again urged Victorians to leave their homes for just four reasons: for groceries, to exercise, working or learning and caregiving.
“I know it is very frustrating, and it is not the place that we wanted to be in, but it’s a clear strategy.
“It will work, but only if every single Victorian and the whole community that will ultimately benefit from that strategy – it only works if we all play our part. It is the simple stuff, the common sense, just doing the right thing, the smart thing. That’s how we will get to the other side of this.”
Masks a part of the answer
Mr Andrews said it was “almost certain” that wearing masks would be part of Victoria’s eventual reopening.
‘It’s quite noticeable that many more people are wearing masks now, and I’m grateful to them,” he said.
He said two million Australian-made, perhaps even Victorian-made, masks would be ordered and distributed to “priority groups”.
“In the meantime… we have ordered some additional single-use masks to replenish any reuse in coming days and weeks. That will principally be in healthcare settings and other settings where we think there’s a really big reward.”
New testing sites
Health Minister Jenny Mikakos has announced new testing sites will be set up in Mernda, Greensborough, Tarneit and on the Mornington Peninsula. There are now more than 150 testing sites across Victoria.
“Ultimately our ambition here is to provide a testing site to everyone within 10km of their home within metropolitan Melbourne and Mitchell Shire, the areas where we have a key focus at the present time,” she said.
Ms Mikakos said the state had now conducted 1,000,095 tests, more than 25,000 since yesterday.
“In terms of our testing rate per 100,000 people, that is now 16,606,” she said.
Hospitals ‘well prepared’
Ms Mikakos said Victoria’s hospitals and health services were “well supported and prepared”.
“They have been working since January to respond to this pandemic. Even when the numbers came down, they never paused in their efforts. They are well resourced and well trained to respond,” she said.
“We have ventilators in our warehouse. We have medical equipment in our warehouse and being distributed to our health services all the time, and personal protective equipment – 32 million masks are sitting in our warehouse as we speak.”
She also urged anyone who was sick with any illnesses to ensure they sought appropriate medical care.
“I take this opportunity to reassure the community that our hospitals remain safe for them to visit.”
Chief Health Officer Brett Sutton said there had now been more than 100 outbreaks across the state and acknowledged there were risks with schools.
“Certainly the Al-Taqwa outbreak had a lot of school-aged children.The risks were in school and out of school. And the physical distancing at school wasn’t ideal. I’m absolutely mindful of the risk with kids in school.”
Professor Sutton said it would be important to exclude unwell children as year 11 and 12 students returned to school, to ensure children were temperature tested and try to ensure social distancing within the classroom.
He also singled out aged care facilities as a source of concern.
“We are seeing single cases with staff members in aged care facilities. That’s the workforce that we have to be really mindful of,” he said.
Professor Brett Sutton said he hoped to see the second wave of infections across Melbourne flatten within the next three to five days.
“I’m hoping for it from now. We know that there were some changes in behaviour in advance of the lockdown and so should also have an effect.”
He said he knew there would continue to be cases of community transmissions because people needed to go to work.
“We need to work with the masks, the workplaces, make sure people are doing the right things in terms of excluding themselves

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University of Houston researches create heated air filter that can kill coronavirus ‘instantly’ – Fox News

Researchers at the University of Houston claimed to have designed a special air filter that can trap the novel coronavirus and blast it with heat to kill the disease on contact.

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Researchers at the University of Houston claimed to have designed a special air filter that can trap the novel coronavirus and blast it with heat to kill the disease on contact.
Dr. Zhifeng Ren, director of the Texas Center of Superconductivity at UH, is the brains behind the project, the Houston Chronicle reported.
Ren worked with Medistar CEO Monzer Hourani to bring about a “unique design” made from heated nickel foam, which was detailed in a paper published by Materials Today Physics.
Researchers reportedly conducted tests at Galveston National Laboratory and found that 99.8 percent of the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19 was killed “instantly,” after a single pass through the filter. The process does, however, require the foam to be heated at 392 degrees Fahrenheit.
TEXAS SEES HIGHEST NUMBER OF CORONAVIRUS CASES RECORDED SINCE START OF PANDEMIC
“This filter could be useful in airports and in airplanes, in office buildings, schools and cruise ships to stop the spread of COVID-19,” Ren explained. “Its ability to help control the spread of the virus could be very useful for society.”
He also said Medistar is looking into offering smaller personalized models that could purify the air around a single employee’s desk or work station, according to the Chronicle.
Dr. Garrett Peel of Medistar, who helped craft the design, suggested that the filters be deployed to “high-priority venues where essential workers are at elevated risk of exposure (particularly schools, hospitals and health care facilities, as well as public transit environs such as airplanes),”
“It’s basically a high-performance COVID-19 killer,” he said. “This is safe and effective. We want to roll this out of Texas first and start deploying them in schools, nursing homes. This unit could be deployed in 60 days.”
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“It provides an extra sense of security, knowing that our children and elderly are protected,” Peel added. ‘We need our leaders to step up and create private and public partnerships to get this product into our schools and protect our children.”

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