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Deep-sea anglerfishes sacrifice their immune system while mating – techtoday19

Deep-sea anglerfishes look quite spectacular – and a little scary. Their mating behavior is also unusual and unique in the animal kingdom. In the most extreme cases, deep-sea anglerfish females may be more than 60 times the length and about half-a-million tim…

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Decades-long deep giant cloud disruption discovered on Venus – Phys.org

A planetary-scale cloud discontinuity has been periodically lashing the depths of the thick blanket of clouds on Venus for at least 35 years, says a study with the participation of the Instituto de Astrofísica e Ciências do Espaço (IA).

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A planetary-scale cloud discontinuity has been periodically lashing the depths of the thick blanket of clouds on Venus for at least 35 years, says a study with the participation of the Instituto de Astrofísica e Ciências do Espaço (IA).
In the cloudy heavens of Venus, consisting mostly of carbon dioxide with clouds made of droplets of sulphuric acid, a giant atmospheric disruption not yet seen elsewhere in the solar system has been rapidly moving at around 50 kilometers above the hidden surface…

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The fight over the Hubble constant – podcast – The Guardian

Madeleine Finlay investigates one of cosmology’s biggest enigmas – the Hubble constant

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When it comes to the expansion rate of the universe, trying to get a straight answer isnt easy. Thats because the two best ways of measuring whats known as the Hubble constant are giving different results. As each method becomes increasingly accurate, the gap between widens. Is one of them wrong? Or is it time to rejig the Standard Model of Cosmology? Madeleine Finlay investigates the so-called Hubble tension with Prof Erminia Calabrese
How to listen to podcasts: everything you need to know…

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Heavy atom spills its guts in decade-long experiment – Live Science

Astatine gobbles and spits out electrons. Two numbers tell us how.

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Wielding proton beams and lasers, physicists have for the first time unlocked one of the key secrets of the rarest naturally occurring element on Earth: astatine.
Astatine is a “halogen,” meaning it shares chemical properties with fluorine, chlorine, bromine and iodine (all elements that typically bind with metals to form salts). But with 85 protons, it’s heavier than lead and is extraordinarily rare on Earth the rarest of the elements that occur naturally in Earth’s crust, according to chemist…

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