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International recommendations for nontuberculous mycobacteria. – Brinkwire

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NTMs are closely related to tuberculosis bacteria and can (but do not need to) cause infectious diseases in humans. They are called “nontuberculous mycobacteria” (NTMs) to distinguish them from tuberculosis bacteria. There are approximately 200 different species and subspecies of these bacteria. Patients with bronchiectasis (dilation of the airways) are particularly affected. It is not uncommon for a chronic infection to develop. The most common pathogens are Mycobacterium avium complex, Mycobacterium kansasii, Mycobacterium xenopi and Mycobacterium abscessus. Unlike tuberculosis, there is practically no known risk of infection with nontuberculous mycobacteria.
“In some countries, more cases are now caused by NTMs than by tuberculosis bacteria,” said Christoph Lange, clinical director of the Research Center Borstel. “It is not always clear when, how and for how long people need treatment.” International recommendations for the treatment of lung diseases caused by NTMs, based on expert opinions rather than scientific evidence, have not been published since 2007. “It was high time for new guidelines,” according to Christoph Lange.
A panel of experts from the leading international societies involved in infectious diseases and pulmonary medicine (ATS, ERS, ESCMID, IDSA) has created a new, evidence-based guideline for the treatment of patients suffering from the most common NTM pathogens. They used the principles of evidence-based medicine with ‘PICO’ questions (Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome). The new recommendations are based on an extensive and systematic literature search, and are graded according to current scientific evidence. A total of thirty-one recommendations has been made for the treatment of NTM lung disease. The new guideline is intended for medical specialists who treat patients with NTM lung disease, including experts in infectious and pulmonary diseases.
Provided byGerman Center for Infection Research

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The WhatsApp messages behind the hiring of security firms for hotel quarantine – The Age

From talk of industry cowboys to contacting company bosses over LinkedIn, messages reveal the scramble to find security for Victoria’s quarantine hotels.

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Wilsons yes, one wrote.
Reputable, another replied.
Wilsons are the kings of the market for sure down there.
Another company name was thrown into the mix, but that firm had been hit and miss with shitty managers in the past, wrote one of the members of the group.
MSS views anyone? someone asked of the firm MSS Security.
MSS also reputable. Not worked with them. Respected in the industry.
The members of the departments employer engagement team turned to professional networking website Linke…

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CHO says Queensland cruises still a long way down the track – Brisbane Times

Queensland’s chief health officer Jeannette Young says cruise ships magnify infections and it would not be safe to begin even Queensland-wide cruising until “later down the track”.

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She added that travelling on cruise ships was not safe during the pandemic.
“The problem with cruise ships is that they lead to transmission very, very readily,” Dr Young said.
“We know that from the past, we always saw outbreaks of norovirus, weve seen outbreaks of flu, so it is not surprising that you would see outbreaks of COVID, so really, they are not safe.”
Queensland Tourism Minister Kate Jones declined to comment.
Opposition tourism spokesman David Crisafulli said health and safety h…

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Parkinson’s disease can affect the eyes – here’s what we know so far – The Conversation UK

Parkinson’s disease may be diagnosed by looking for subtle changes in eye movements and thinning of retina layers.

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Parkinsons disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disease, affecting over 10 million people worldwide. Its characterised by changes in movement, including tremors, and slower and more rigid movements. But researchers are also beginning to investigate other symptoms of Parkinsons disease including those involving the eye.
Parkinsons results from the degeneration of dopamine neurons in the brains basal ganglia an area involved in voluntary movement. Though no cure exists for Parkins…

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